iFreeThai

#1 June 10, 2018 3:17 AM

ปาปียอง
Member
Registered: July 18, 2015
Posts: 1,227

ความตายของแอนโทนี่ โบเดน(Anthony Bourdain) ที่โลกสุดเศร้า

จจ

]

;;;;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony_Bourdain

https://www.google.com/search?q=photo+a … AGgQsAQIOQ

วันนี้จะตรงกับวันพ่อ(Father Day)อีกหนึ่งอาทิตย์ข้างหน้าในอเมริกา วันอาทิตย์ที่สามของเดือนมิถุนายน พวกผู้ชายที่เป็นพ่อไม่ว่าจะอยู่แห่งหนตำบลใด ต่างรอลูกหลานต่างทักทายกัน " Happy Father Day, Dad" เพื่อเป็นเกียรติให้กับความเป็นพ่อ..หรือเคยเป็นพ่อมาก่อน  แต่ปีนี้แอนโทนี่ โบเดนไม่มีโอกาสได้ได้ยินลูกสาวคนเดียวอายุย่างเข้าสิบเอ็ดขวบของเขาตะโกนเรียกเสียงสุดดัง..."พ่อจ๋า หนูรักพ่อคะ-Dad I love you very much" อีกต่อไป  เขาได้ทำลายชีวิตตัวเองที่ห้องพักโรงแรมหรูกลางกรุงปาริส ขณะกำลังถ่ายทำหนังสาระบันเทิงเรื่องอาหารที่เขาได้ท่องเที่ยวเป็นทูตทางวัฒนธรรมอาหารการกิน เดินทางไปทั่วโลกล่าสุดถึง 224 วันใน 1 ปี เขาเป็นทั้ง"พ่อครัวหัวเห็ด-Chef and writer" นักเขียนและต่อมาเป็นนักทำภาพยนต์สารคดี นำผู้คนไปชิมอาหาร พบผู้คน เห็นและส้มผัสประเพณี"การดื่มกิน" ล้วนเป็นความสัมพันธ์ของมนุษย์ ทั้งในครอบครัวที่ต้องประกอบอาหารลี้ยงดูสมาชิกภายในบ้าน และการรวมพรรคพวกไปหากินอาหารสุดอร่อยประจำวัน และแน่นอนการดื่มเหล้า-เบียร์-ไวน์ระหว่างเพื่อนฝูง เฮฮากันสนุกสนานของเพื่อนร่วมโลก

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-44414747

The deaths of chef and TV host Anthony Bourdain and fashion designer Kate Spade this week underscored some grim numbers about increases in suicide rates. The latest CDC report found that 54 percent of people who died by suicide over the last two decades did not have a known mental health condition. Amna Nawaz talks with Dr. Liza Gold about risks, treatment and the scope of the problem.

Read the Full Transcript
Judy Woodruff:

And now some disturbing findings about suicides in this country and how the rate has continued to climb for more than 15 years.

A new report highlights some of the reasons behind these patterns.

And, as Amna Nawaz reports, it’s issued at a moment when two notable deaths have drawn more attention to the problem.

Amna Nawaz:

The deaths of chef and TV host Anthony Bourdain and fashion designer Kate Spade this week underscored some grim numbers.

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. In 2016 alone, nearly 45,000 Americans died by suicide. CNN announced today that Bourdain, who took viewers to locations around the world on his show, died at the age of 61.

Spade, whose handbags and accessories made her a business mogul and a fashion icon, died Tuesday at the age of 55.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s latest report found suicide rates have increased in nearly every state in America since 2000. In half of all states, the rate rose more than 25 percent, and some of the largest increases were in Mountain States and the Midwest. That includes rural areas, where incomes can be stagnant, poverty can be high, and where financial stress can add to pressures in middle- and low-income American families.

Experts in the field say there are almost always multiple causes of suicide. And, in fact, the CDC reported this week that 54 percent of people who died by suicide over the last two decades didn’t have a known mental health condition.

Some insight now about risks, treatment and the scope of the problem.

Dr. Liza Gold has spent her career on trying to prevent suicide with proper treatment and interventions. She is a clinical professor of psychiatry at Georgetown University School of Medicine.

Dr. Gold, welcome to the “NewsHour.”

Dr. Liza Gold:

Thank you for having me.

Amna Nawaz:

Let me ask you. These numbers now are striking, 45,000 suicides last year alone. Just from a public health perspective, what do we know about why this is happening?

Dr. Liza Gold:

Well, I don’t think we really have a very good handle on why the numbers are going up, but it’s clear that they are going up.

And out of the top 10 causes of death in the United States, leading cause, suicide is number 10, it’s one of the three in the top 10 that’s actually going up, instead of going down.

Amna Nawaz:

The one in three, as you mention, that continue to rise.

Now, it’s worth pointing out a couple of things we know from these multiyear studies. The age group with the highest vulnerability when it comes to suicide, Americans 45 to 64 years old.

And something else we have learned recently, that gender gap that used to exist…

Dr. Liza Gold:

Yes.

Amna Nawaz:

… that men were more likely to take their lives than women, that seems to be shrinking, too.

Dr. Liza Gold:

Yes.

Amna Nawaz:

What do we know about that?

Dr. Liza Gold:

Well, what we know about that is that more — women have always made more attempts than men have made at suicide.

The ratio has always been about 3-point-something to one in terms of attempts, but men have always been more likely to complete a suicide than women have been.

I think the key factor in that shift has been increasing access to firearms, which is a highly lethal method of suicide. About 50 percent of all suicides are firearms. And women are becoming more comfortable over the past years, as accessibility and other programs have made women more likely to also buy firearms.

It used to be that only men really — not only, but primarily men had firearms.

Amna Nawaz:

One of the other things we have learned now is every time there is a high-profile or celebrity suicide, the conversation shifts to mental health very, very quickly.

And we know now from this multiyear study that 54 percent, more than half of the people who died by suicide in that study didn’t have a mental health diagnosis at the time of their death.

So what are we to understand about that number, about that 54 percent?

Dr. Liza Gold:

Well, I think that probably many of them probably did, but had not sought assessment or treatment. So, I think that number is very low.

But another way of thinking about it is that suicide is a behavior, not a diagnosis, and it can be associated with life crises, as well as with mental health problems.

And so, when we think about preventing suicide, we have to think about preventing a behavior, whether it’s been associated with mental illness or not. With or without mental illness, we have to intervene. It’s not just the mental illness that creates the crisis.

Amna Nawaz:

And some of those studies list there are a number of contributing factors. It’s not just about mental health. Right? There’s also relationship problems, substance abuse, physical health, financial problems.

But you mentioned treatment in your answer there. Help me understand, what does that look like? What does that entail?

Dr. Liza Gold:

Well, it depends on what the problem is.

But the most common diagnoses associated with suicide are substance abuse problems and mood disorders. And we have treatment for both of those problems, particularly for mood disorders. We do a pretty good job these days, between cognitive behavioral therapy and medication, in terms of helping people with mood disorders, so that — so that one of the two evidence-based interventions that will reduce rates of suicide, incidents of suicide are mental health treatment.

And people who survive the — the other one is lethal means restriction, taking away the things that they use to kill themselves, so putting nets up on bridges, so they can’t jump, removing firearms from someone who is in crisis, someone who has a stash of pills, holding on to those.

So what we know about mental health treatment is that it does work, that it does decrease rates of suicide, and that people who have made a suicide attempt and who have survived it and who get into treatment are actually not likely to die by suicide.

So they get better. And it’s unfortunate that there’s so much stigma attached both to mental health diagnoses and treatment and to suicide, still considered a very shameful thing in many places. Many people don’t want to talk about it, don’t want to acknowledge a family member who’s committed suicide, et cetera.

So, in order to get to treatment, you have to, A, increase the mental health resources upstream as far as possible, and, B, you have to destigmatize seeking treatment and receiving treatment.

Amna Nawaz:

For people who are worried about a loved one or someone that they may know, what are they looking for?

Dr. Liza Gold:

Looking for changes in behavior, really signs that someone might be in crisis, so, unusual behaviors, isolating themselves, becoming uncommunicative, not going in to work, withdrawing from relationships.

Those are sort of warning signs, potentially, of depression or substance use, someone thinking about killing themselves.

Amna Nawaz:

If you see those things, you hear those things, what do you do, what do you say? And, also, what do you not do or say?

Dr. Liza Gold:

Reach out. That’s the most important thing.

And if you’re really concerned, be persistent, and use the word suicide when — if you’re really that concerned, because that gives people permission to talk about something they might be embarrassed or ashamed to bring up themselves.

Amna Nawaz:

Dr. Liza Gold, thank you for your time.

Dr. Liza Gold:

Thank you for having me.

Amna Nawaz:

Before we go, for anyone out there who needs help or knows someone who needs help, it is available to you 24/7 for free.

Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK. That is 1-800-273-TALK.

Or text HOME to 741741.

Or visit suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

เขาจะเน้น และแนะนำผู้ชมไปพบกับร้านอาหารสุดอร่อย แบบแบกะดินข้างถนน ที่ชาวบ้านชาวช่องทั่วไปรับความสนุกสำราญในแต่ละท้องถิ่น ตามซอกตามซอยทั่วโลก ด้วยสนนราคาที่แบบแบกะดินเช่นกัน ด้วยบุคคลิกหน้าตาของเขาซึ่งเป็นคนมีความอบอุ่น จริงใจ สนทนาปราศรัยอย่างสนุกสนาน เฮฮาครื้นเครงเป็นเจ้าทุนที่เป็นอุปนิสัยประจำตัวอยู่แล้ว จึงทำให้ทีวีโชว์รายการของเขาที่ซีเอ็นเอ็น(CNN)ถึงกับได้รับรางวัลดีเด่นมาหลายครั้ง จนเขามีเรทติ้งทางด้านการท่องเที่ยวเกี่ยวกับการหาอาหารกินทั่วโลกสูงมาก อย่างชนิดที่ใครได้ชมรายการของเขายากจะลืม และหวลกลับมาดูอีกๆๆ  เพราะเขาเป็นมนุษย์สุดวิเศษที่"เชื่อมติด-Human connection"ในความเป็นมนุษย์ที่ธรรมดากับผู้อื่นอันเป็นประชากรโลก ที่เขามองเป็นสหายหรือเพื่อนเสมอทุกคน  เขาพบใครร่วมโต๊ะอาหารกับใครหรือกับตัวท่าน  จะทำให้ผู้นั้นมีความอบอุ่นเหมือนกับได้พบเพื่อนเก่าสมัยนักเรียน มามีโอกาสได้ร่วมกันกินอาหารอีกครั้ง  นี่คือเสน่ห์ในตัวของแอนโทนี่ โบเดน...เขาคงยังไม่ตายกระมัง?

บีบีซี(BBC)ได้ตัดตอนบางส่วนที่โจนาทาน เฮด(Jonathan Head) หน.ฝ่ายข่าวในเอเซีย เอาตอนการนำปธน.บารัค โอบาม่าไปเยือนฮานอย เวียตนาม เขานั่งกินเฝอ(ก๋วยเตี๋ยว-Vietnamese soup noodle) ในร้านเล็กๆสุดอร่อย ผักจานเบ้อเร่อ มีมะนาวฝานหั่นเป็นซีกๆ และพริกสดพร้อมถั่วงอกสุดสด ที่กัดเคี้ยวมีเสียงดังน้ำแตกกระจายด้วย เสริฟใส่ชามที่กำลังร้อนควันโขมง ตามธรรมเนียมที่เชฟคนไหนปรุงถ้วยไหนเขาจะเป็นคนประคองถือมาเสริฟถึงที่โต๊ะด้วย อาหารมื้อนั้นพร้อมเบียร์สองขวดจากฮานอย เมืองที่เป็นเจ้าของก๋วยเตี๋ยวเฝอที่สำคัญของโลก ราคาหกดอลล่าห์
เสียดายโอบาม่าตอนมาไทย ไม่ได้มาลองผ้ดไทย ต้มยำกุ้ง กุ้งพล่า ยำไข่ปลาดุก ยำหัวปลี ลาบ ตำบักฮุ่ง  ต้มเครื่องในวัว  แจ่วบองและรสแซบและเสือฮ้องไห้ในไทย คุณยิ่งลักษณ์เชิญเลี้ยงแต่อาหารชาววัง กินกระทบแก้วแชมเปญทรงสูงไปเสียฉิบ  ของดีเมืองไทยแถวสะพานเหล็ก เยาวราช ประตูน้ำ สามย่าน ท่าพระจันทร์ เฝอวัดดงมูลเหล็ก  ฯลฯ โอบาม่าไม่ได้ลิ้มรสและบรรยากาศ ยามคนไทยรวมกลุ่มกับคนรักๆ ...กินอาหารร่วมกัน
....คิดถึงเพื่อนเก่าในเวปนี้...."ป้าพลอย"ของเรา อย่างจับใจ

มิฉะนั้นโอบาม่าคงคิดกลับมาเยือนไทยอีก ซึ่งตอนนี้กลายเป็นกลาแลนด์ไปเสียแล้ว 
คนไทยเคยมีกินของอร่อยยี่สิบสี่ชั่วโมง ยิ้ม-หัวเราะ-กระซิกกระเซ้าต่อกัน...ตอนนี้คนไทยมีแต่น้ำตา อดๆหยากๆ
อะไรก็แพงไปหมด อะไรก็ขาดหายไปหมด

ทหารจปร.ไทยทำกับคนไทยมาตลอด อย่างบัดซบสิ้นดี !!
จะไม่ลืมพวกมึง ไอ้เหี้ย !!

R.I.P Anthony Bourdain
thanks to have a chance to know you, my friend.
ปล.สถิติคนอเมริกันฆ่าตัวตาย 45,000 คนปี 2016

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-44416727

Last edited by ปาปียอง (June 10, 2018 12:03 PM)

Offline

#2 June 10, 2018 1:12 PM

ปาปียอง
Member
Registered: July 18, 2015
Posts: 1,227

Re: ความตายของแอนโทนี่ โบเดน(Anthony Bourdain) ที่โลกสุดเศร้า

ขอต่อคลิปวิดีโอเพื่อสท้อนกลับกับชีวิตส่วนตัวของแอนโทนี่ โบเดน
ส่วนมากจะมาจากเพื่อนๆที่ซีเอ็นเอ็น

สุดเศร้าที่คนที่มีความสำเร็จขนาดนี้ จะเลือกเส้นทางทำลายตัวเอง
....อาจจะเป็นเพราะยาเสพติดที่เขาใช้มาตลอด ทำลายเขาในที่สุด

Last edited by ปาปียอง (June 10, 2018 1:22 PM)

Offline

Board footer

iFreeThai is public forum for Thai, Lao, Vietnamese and American. We discuss about News, Politics and Human Rights issues through Southeast Asia. For inquiries please contact: Dr. Richard Saisomorn P O BOX 194 SPIRO, OKLAHOMA 74959 USA ; E-mail: amerilao@gmail.com
*All articles and photos published on this website is copyrighted by their respective owners.